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Billrothstrasse 78
Vienna 1190
Austria

+43.1.36036.5900

Plastische und Rekonstruktive Chirurgie

Plastischer Chirurg

Professor Dr. Chieh-Han John Tzou was trained at the Medical University of Vienna, Austria (MUW) and at the Chang Gung Medical University Taipei-Linkou, Taiwan. He was a visitor at the Asan Medical Center, Seoul, South Korea and the Medical University of Tokyo, Japan. He is specialist in Plastic, Aesthetic and Reconstructive Surgery and his research focus is in facial palsy, lymphedema and the peripheral nerve.
He has been invited to numerous international conferences; moreover as a mentor and teacher he has trained plastic reconstructive surgeons, medical students and medical nurses at the Medical University Hospital of Vienna, Austria.

Nerve

Denervation Procedures
Denervation is a surgical procedure for eliminating the nerve supply to a specific area of the body, providing pain relief. The primary goal of this procedure is to improve patients’ function, minimize pain and disability, and help patients realize their full function in spite of their painful and sometimes disabling nerve pain symptoms. Before any denervation procedure of a nerve, a specialized nerve radiologist will simulate the denervation by locating the nerve and infiltrating it with local anesthetics to provide temporarily pain relief. After successful infiltration, the denervation procedure is carried out surgically.

 

Nerve Decompression
Nerve Decompression is required in severe cases of nerve compression, especially in those that are unresponsive to the conservative treatments. This surgery treats a variety of peripheral nerve entrapments, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome or tarsal tunnel syndrome, supinator syndrome, pronator syndrome, and entrapment caused by tumors. Several operations are used to reduce the pressure on the nerve, including simple opening of the roof of the tunnel (decompression), moving the nerve into a new location at the front of the elbow (transposition) and widening the tunnel by removing some of its bony floor (medial epicondylectomy). Surgery improves the numbness and function of the compressed nerve, and its chief objective is to prevent the progressive muscle weakness and atrophy that occur in untreated cases.

 

Nerve Reconstruction
Nerve Reconstruction is a microsurgical procedure to repair a nerve defect with direct coaptation, nerve grafting or nerve transfer. Direct repair facilitates coaptation of two nerve stumps without tension, allowing the nerve to regenerate. In cases there is a nerve gap and a direct repair is not tension free, a nerve graft (sural nerve) will be harvested to bridge the nerve gap. The nerve graft serves as a conduit, in which the nerve grows through the gap and regenerates approximately 1 mm per day to its target. Nerve transfer (neurotization) is another nerve reconstruction technique to direct a healthy nerve to innervate (neurotize) a damaged nerve.

 

Nerve Tumor
Nerve Tumors are tumors originating from nerve tissues. The removal of the tumor is in the aspect of complete resection. In some cases, nerve tumors can be dissected out of the nerve, sparing the nerve fibers. Nerve reconstruction is applied, when resection of the nerve results in a nerve tissue defect, restoring the nerve continuity.

NERVE

 

Denervation Procedures

Denervation is a surgical procedure for eliminating the nerve supply to a specific area of the body, providing pain relief. The primary goal of this procedure is to improve patients’ function, minimize pain and disability, and help patients realize their full function in spite of their painful and sometimes disabling nerve pain symptoms. Before any denervation procedure of a nerve, a specialized nerve radiologist will simulate the denervation by locating the nerve and infiltrating it with local anesthetics to provide temporarily pain relief. After successful infiltration, the denervation procedure is carried out surgically.

 

Nerve Decompression

Nerve Decompression is required in severe cases of nerve compression, especially in those that are unresponsive to the conservative treatments. This surgery treats a variety of peripheral nerve entrapments, such as carpal tunnel syndrome, cubital tunnel syndrome or tarsal tunnel syndrome, supinator syndrome, pronator syndrome, and entrapment caused by tumors. Several operations are used to reduce the pressure on the nerve, including simple opening of the roof of the tunnel (decompression), moving the nerve into a new location at the front of the elbow (transposition) and widening the tunnel by removing some of its bony floor (medial epicondylectomy). Surgery improves the numbness and function of the compressed nerve, and its chief objective is to prevent the progressive muscle weakness and atrophy that occur in untreated cases.

 

Nerve Reconstruction

Nerve Reconstruction is a microsurgical procedure to repair a nerve defect with direct coaptation, nerve grafting or nerve transfer. Direct repair facilitates coaptation of two nerve stumps without tension, allowing the nerve to regenerate. In cases there is a nerve gap and a direct repair is not tension free, a nerve graft (sural nerve) will be harvested to bridge the nerve gap. The nerve graft serves as a conduit, in which the nerve grows through the gap and regenerates approximately 1 mm per day to its target. Nerve transfer (neurotization) is another nerve reconstruction technique to direct a healthy nerve to innervate (neurotize) a damaged nerve.

 

Nerve Tumor

Nerve Tumors are tumors originating from nerve tissues. The removal of the tumor is in the aspect of complete resection. In some cases, nerve tumors can be dissected out of the nerve, sparing the nerve fibers. Nerve reconstruction is applied, when resection of the nerve results in a nerve tissue defect, restoring the nerve continuity.